Spectacular arrival of Boco blades

The length of the blade was a traffic stopper.

The length of the blade was a traffic stopper.

Kate Ryan

Pictures by Meryl Helmers                                                    

BOMBALA residents witnessed the first two blade components for the Boco Rock Wind Farm make their way up Maybe Street on Monday. 

The 48.7 metre long blades were a spectacular sight with curious locals taking the opportunity to watch the operation take place. 

Bombala IGA’s Kelly Power said the gigantic blades were the biggest things she had ever seen come down the main street. 

“They were massive and they are drawing a bit of a crowd, we had customers going out to watch them move around the roundabout,” Mrs Power said. 

“It was quiet impressive to see them turn and manoeuvre.” 

Mrs Power, who had previously held reservations about the use of Maybe Street for the transport of the Boco Rock Wind Farm blades, said the movement had not affected her business.

“In terms of my business it has not changed a thing and I have had no complaints,” she said. 

“It takes such a short time for the trucks to make their way down the street, I think it’s less than 10 minutes.”

When moving the blade components the trucks must use the wrong side of the road to navigate the roundabout on Maybe Street. 

Boco Rock Wind Farm spokeswoman Siobhan Isherwood said the first movements of the blades were a complete success.

Residents will see more trucks make their way through town in the coming weeks. 

“The schedule has been running smoothly, and we’ve had great feedback from residents and business owners alike,” Ms Isherwood said.

“People have been contacting us to find out where they can catch a glimpse of the loads, and have commented on how efficiently trucks have come through town.

“Over the coming months the tower sections and nacelles that residents have already seen will continue, as well as a typical delivery of two blades each day,” Ms Isherwood said. 

“At this stage, between four and five loads will come through Bombala each day. 

“Bombala residents have seen the mid-morning deliveries come through town so far, and trucks will now also be coming through in the early afternoon,” she said.

The delivery of the giant turbines to the Nimmitabel site requires specialised drivers who have travelled from Sydney and staying in Bombala while the operation is completed. 

“The drivers have been making a lot of new friends, and are settling in nicely,” she said.

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