Celebrating platypus in Bombala

October is an ideal spotting time for platypus in Bombala and with that in mind the Bombala Platypus Visitors Information Centre (VIC) has organised a number of activities.

PLATYPUS TIME: The Bombala Platypus Visitors Information Centre is holding a number of activities during the month of October including a Platypus Day on Saturday.

PLATYPUS TIME: The Bombala Platypus Visitors Information Centre is holding a number of activities during the month of October including a Platypus Day on Saturday.

On Friday, October 11, at 11am, there is a free guided river walk session with special guest presenter Antia Brademann from Cooma Waterwatch.

Participants can learn about platypus biology, spotting tips and current dangers for the platypus.

A spokesperson for the VIC said a minimum number of attendees are needed to run the Bombala River walk and platypus talk.

"Please register your attendance by 3pm Thursday. Children must be supervised by an adult."

Saturday is Platypus Day in Bombala with all things platypus happening from 10am to 2pm in Riverside Bicentennial Park.

Children will be able to meet Paddy the SES platypus and take part in platypus craft stalls.

"A Scavenger Hunt and Skate Park Jam have been organised with a jumping castle for the youngsters.

Frock'n'Troll will be there playing live music and plenty of food vendors will be on hand including the Rotary barbecue, Lions donuts, kebabs and fairy floss.

Unique Platypus 

Platypus are quite abundant in local rivers and are easier to see around Bombala and Delegate than any other places because of how many there are.

The best times to see platypus is early in the morning or in the evening at sunset and occasionally you will spot one during the day.

According to Aboriginal legend, the first platypus was born after a young duck mated with a lonely water rat.

The Europeans didn't believe there was such an animal when they first saw it in England thinking it was an elaborate hoax however that was proven not to be.

The platypus became a protected species in 1901.

Platypus live alone for most of the year, but around November and December, males can be noticed more often as they cruise the waterways for a female companion.

Platypus swimming together and chasing each others tails are in a flirtatious mood.

By February the female platypus has chosen her incubating burrow where she will lay up to three eggs.

The eggs are incubated for about 10 days and once the baby platypus hatch the mother feeds them for about six weeks from milk glands on her belly.

The baby platypus emerge from the nesting burrow by April.

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